Manufacturing MarketTrends | April 2019, Issue 1

Welcome to Foley’s new Manufacturing MarketTrends newsletter. In each edition, we will highlight key trends to watch out for in 2019, making it a year of change for manufacturers.

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AI is Here to Stay: Are You Prepared?

Machine Learning. Deep Learning. Data Mining. Predictive Analytics. Natural Language Processing.

These are the buzzwords used to describe the pivotal artificial intelligence (AI) space. Companies in every industry, from automotive and electronics to financial services, health care and life sciences, are working to deploy these advanced technology methods in order to bring their innovations to the next level. AI can help pathologists identify diseases, and physicians better assess brain health. It can help bankers automate back-office processes, create more lifelike chatbots, and improve fair lending practices. It can process and collect data more efficiently, protect from cyberattacks, and improve driver safety. As with any disruptive technology, however, this AI race to the moon comes with its share of risks and challenges. Are you prepared to address the various issues that this new technology may bring?

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Right Tool, Right Job: Smart Manufacturing Requires Focus on Intellectual Property

Public-Private Manufacturing Innovation Institutes Announced

The transition from traditional manufacturing techniques and technologies to techniques leveraging automation and data exchange technologies, cyber-physical systems, the Internet of things, cloud computing and cognitive computing, sometimes referred to as “Industry 4.0,” holds great promise for manufacturers but, like any change, also holds dangers for the unwary.     Continue reading this entry

Puerto Rico Case Highlights Need for Secured Parties to Adhere to Good Practices in Documenting Secured Transactions

balance sheet

Manufacturers encounter financing statements in many contexts – as a borrower, as a supplier of goods sold on credit, as a seller in a leveraged acquisition, as a seller of equipment where financing is provided to the buyer (purchase money financing), or as a supplier providing secured credit to a distributor. As simple and commonplace as they may seem, the requirements for financing statements are technical and the consequences of failure to satisfy them are draconian.

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